General Information
NameDr. Arnon Sturm
DepartmentDepartment of Software and Information Systems Engineering
Emailsturm@bgu.ac.il
Personal Web SitePersonal Web Site
Academic RankSenior lecturer
FunctionSeminar coordinator , Department of Software and Information Systems Engineering


Bibliography

  Scholar DBLP
   

Research Interests

 
  • Domain Engineering, Software Development Methods, Methodologies, Object-Oriented Analysis and Design, Knowledge Management and Engineering
   

Research Abstract

 
  • My research relates to the development of software systems. In particular, I am studying two major fields: conceptual modeling and development processes. Within the area of conceptual modeling I have started enhancing and formalizing the Object-Process Methodology (OPM). This includes the generation of database scheme out of an OPM-based conceptual system model (Sturm, 1999), the modeling of events (Reinhartz-Berger, Sturm, and Dori, 2002), and the generation of data warehouse schemata for conceptual models (Dori, Feldman, and Sturm, 2005). In addition, I actively participate in the development of OPCAT – the OPM CASE tool (Dori and Sturm, 1998; Dori et al., 1998; Dori, Reinhartz-Beger, and Sturm, 2003).
  • I further examined specific domains in which OPM could be useful. One of the immature domains is the area of agent-based systems. Analyzing the limitation of existing work of agent-oriented software engineering, in general, and agent-oriented modeling methods, in particular (Shehory and Sturm, 2001; Sturm and Shehory, 2003; Sturm and Shehory 2004), I have developed a new modeling language for specifying multi-agent systems (Sturm, Dori, and Shehory, 2003; Sturm, Dori, and Shehory, 2004). The language which I developed is based on domain analysis principles. Generalizing that work, I came up with an OPM-based framework for developing domain specific application (Sturm, Dori, and Shehory, 2006).
  • Based on the experience I accumulated in the area of domain analysis we further generalized the approach and formed the Application-Based Domain Modeling (ADOM) approach which is language independent. This approach enables modeling domains as if they were regular applications, reducing the efforts required for validating domain-specific application models against their domain models. The ADOM approach consists of three layers: language, domain, and application. The language layer includes metamodels of modeling languages. In the domain layer, the domain elements and relations are modeled using regular software and application engineering concepts, as defined in the language layer. Finally, in the application layer, the required applications are modeled using the knowledge and constraints presented in the domain and language layers. To enable validation of application models in a specific domain, the application elements are classified according to the domain concepts. We applied that approach to UML (Sturm and Reinhartz-Beger, 2004; Reinhartz-Beger and Sturm, 2004) and also utilize that approach to reference models (Reinhartz-Beger, Soffer, and Sturm, 2005), in which reference models belong to the domain layer, while specific business process models belong to the application layer. At this stage, we continuously evaluating the ADOM approach, and further establishing it. In particular, in the scope of a Deutch Telekom project, I am trying to examine the feasibility of using the ADOM approach within the area of reference models and build a process according to which a domain model will be constructed from an application models related to that domain.
   

Tools used for education

 
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